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Synopsis Home Genesis Introduction
Genesis
Introduction
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Chapters 6 to 8
Chapter 9
Chapters 10 and 11
Chapter 12
Chapters 13 and 14
Chapter 15
Chapter 16
Chapter 17
Chapter 18
Chapter 19
Chapters 20 and 21
Chapters 22 to 24
Chapter 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapter 28
Chapters 29 to 35
Chapter 36
Chapters 37 to 41
Chapters 42 to 47
Chapters 48 to 50

Its distinctive character presenting the great elementary principles of the relationships of God with man

Genesis has a character of its own; and, as the beginning of the Holy Book, presents to us all the great elementary principles which find their development in the history of the relationships of God with man, which is recorded in the following books. The germ of each of these principles will be found here, unless we except the law. There was however a law given to Adam in his innocence; and Hagar, we know, prefigures at least Sinai. There is scarce anything afterwards accomplished of which the expression is not found in this book in one form or another. There is found also in it, though the sad history of man's fall be there, a freshness in the relationship of men with God, which is scarce met with afterwards in men accustomed to abuse it and to live in a society full of itself. But whether it be the creation, man and his fall, sin, the power of Satan, the promises, the call of God, His judgment of the world, redemption, the covenants, the separation of the people of God, their condition of strangers on the earth, the resurrection, the establishment of Israel in the land of Canaan, the blessing of the nations, the seed of promise, the exaltation of a rejected Lord to the throne of the world, all are found here in fact or in figure -- in figure, now that we have the key, even the church itself.

Synopsis by John Darby