Close Please enter your Username and Password
Synopsis Home Deuteronomy Chapter 32
Deuteronomy
Introduction
Chapters 1 to 4
Chapters 5 to 7
Chapters 8 to 11
Chapters 12 and 13
Chapters 14 and 15
Chapters 16 and 17
Chapter 18
Chapters 19 to 21
Chapters 22 to 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapters 28 and 29
Chapter 30
Chapter 31
Chapter 32
Chapter 33
Chapter 34

Moses' prophetic song based on the people's foreknown fall

We have the prophetic song, which is based on the foreknown fall of the people. First, it declares the perfectness of Jehovah, whatever may take place; it is Israel who have corrupted themselves (compare Ps. 22: 3. Christ can say, "Why?") At the same time (ver. 8) we have an all-important declaration; namely, that God, in His government of the world, had made Israel the centre, and had arranged the nations of the earth, in their various localities, as having respect to the bounds of Israel as being the first object of those ways. For His earthly people are Jehovah's portion, His inheritance upon earth. But Jeshurun (Israel) waxed fat, and kicked, and forsook the Rock of his strength. Consequently God moves them to jealousy with those that are not a people. It is the call of the Gentiles, according to Romans 10: 19.

God's ways with Israel and the Gentiles

The judgment, nevertheless, falls upon Israel, so that God would have destroyed them, had not the glory of His name hindered Him, for the Gentiles proved themselves perfectly wicked. Then, the people being distressed, without strength and without hope, He remembers them, and finally takes vengeance on their enemies, those idolatrous Gentiles. But, though avenging Himself, it is then that, having restored His people Israel, He will cause the Gentiles to rejoice in Him.

Israel yet to be restored, and God's mercy shown to His land and His people

This principle is true already; but the testimony it furnishes will be fully accomplished when Israel is again restored to the enjoyment of the promises; when God will manifest His mercy towards His land, as well as towards His people. The whole course of His dealings, in respect of the people who form the centre of His ways upon earth, is thus fully brought out. Afterwards, Moses puts obedience (the great end of this book, Israel being placed under the condition of obedience for continuance in the enjoyment of the promises) before them again, and reminds them that thereby they would prolong their days in the land which they were going up to possess.

Moses' sight of the land

At last poor Moses has to go up Mount Nebo, to see the land into which he cannot enter, not having answered the requirement of the glory of God in the wilderness, nor sanctified His name by faith. It is the unavoidable consequence of the just government of God towards a servant -- I mean under the law. He does not get into the enjoyment of the promise. A single fault deprives him of it.

Synopsis by John Darby