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Synopsis Home Deuteronomy Chapters 8 to 11
Deuteronomy
Introduction
Chapters 1 to 4
Chapters 5 to 7
Chapters 8 to 11
Chapters 12 and 13
Chapters 14 and 15
Chapters 16 and 17
Chapter 18
Chapters 19 to 21
Chapters 22 to 25
Chapter 26
Chapter 27
Chapters 28 and 29
Chapter 30
Chapter 31
Chapter 32
Chapter 33
Chapter 34

Calling to remembrance God's care, His twofold dealings and their own perverseness

In chapter 8, in the most instructive and touching language as to the care God had taken of them, while keeping them in dependence, and His object in doing so, he also brings to mind the dealings of God with them by the way, [1] as a motive; and how God had humbled and had exercised them, lest, through the enjoyment of the blessings of the good land into which He was bringing them, they should be puffed up (for it was God who gave them the needed strength); that otherwise God would destroy them, as He had destroyed the nations. On the other hand (chap. 9), He reminds them of their continual perverseness, in order to shew them that it was not on account of their righteousness, but because of the wickedness of the nations, that God drove them out before them. [2] This he applies to them (chap 10), reminding them that God had renewed the tables of the law, urging them to circumcise their hearts, to care for the stranger, remembering how God had enlarged them since they went down as strangers to Egypt.

God's judgments; the beauty of the promised land; blessing dependent on obedience

Then, in chapter 11, he brings to their remembrance the judgments upon the Egyptians, and those upon Dathan and Abiram; and declares to them the beauty and excellency of the land into which they are about to enter, a land upon which the eyes of Jehovah ever rested; [3] and, lastly, he puts before them the blessing and the curse which there awaited them, according to their conduct, when brought in; charging them to keep carefully the commandments of the Lord, and to teach them to their children. And it is added, that, by keeping the commandments of God, they would be able to take possession, according to the full extent of the promise. But here all depends on their obedience to this conditional covenant which made them Jehovah's, whose exclusively they were to be; sovereign restoring grace does not come till chapter 30.

[1] See particularly verses 2-4; 15,16.

[2] It is important to keep this in mind. Israel was the rod in God's hand to get rid of intolerable evil. Therefore also they were not to spare.

[3] The terms in which this is expressed present a perfectly beautiful contrast between the carefulness of man in seeking for blessing, and the grace from above.

Synopsis by John Darby